Tag Archives: dual flush toilet

fish

Save Some Water for the Fish

In honor of Earth Day, the guys from G&C Plumbing and Heating would like to share some handy plumbing tips on how to save the world (and, inadvertently, cash and Karma) It might even make you feel good to know you’re doing something helpful for the earth – You’re welcome.

“Save some water for the fish,” my mom always yelled at the bathroom door when I was a kid,” said Greg Sheck, the Grand Master Plumber from G&C Plumbing and Heating in Franklin, MA. “Alright, alright, mom,” I’d yell, wondering how my three-minute shower was going to somehow, single handedly, keep the fishing industry alive. That’s a kid for you. I’m just glad I can now proactively help my mother’s ’cause’ on a much grander scale as a plumber. This one’s for you, mom.

Drip… Drip…Drip…

Aside from the annoying sight and sound, a dripping faucet can waste more than 10 gallons of water per day – That’s like $100 every year around these parts. “First and foremost, make sure your taps are fully turned off,” said Sheck who spent a bunch of time yelling at his own kids over the years to make sure they turned the faucets all the way off. “However, if you find yourself trying to twist a tap very tightly only to find it continues to drip, you should probably replace it immediately.” ($100 a year – cough, cough)

If possible, upgrade your standard faucets with low-flow substitutes, or better yet, an aerator faucet that has a circular screened disk of metal that modifies the overall flow. “Along the same lines, an upgraded low-flow showerhead only consumes 2.5 gallons of water per minute, instead of the standard 4.5 gallons,” said Sheck. So, if we do the math correctly, that would save more than 20,000 gallons of water per year. That’s like a gazillion dollars!

And, good news, most low-flow showerhead models available today have a good, strong shower stream- the guys recommend them all the time in their bathroom remodeling projects.

Unmasking the Leakers

Just like in the White House, leakers often attempt to remain anonymous, and not all water leaks can easily be spotted. (What? – Even Plumbers Without Cracks have a sense of humor)

A good way to determine if you’re home has a hidden leak is to make it a habit to check the water meter before and after a specific period when the water is not in use. If the meter has drastically changed, then there’s a good possibility that there’s a hidden leak somewhere and you should call Gregg and Brandon to come check it out.

The Problem with John

Toilet flushing consumes about 30% of your water bill. That’s a lot of cash to flush down the drain. If you have a standard toilet, you might want to upgrade it to a low-flow or dual flush option. “With a dual flush option, you can choose between a higher-flush for solid waste or lower-flush option for liquid waste. The lower-flush uses less than 1.3 gallons of water,” said Sheck who made that toilet talk sound so professional we couldn’t even make a number two joke or anything – Thanks Greg.

If you’re not ready to replace your toilets just yet, then just make sure they’re not running when not in use. “That can be a sign that the flapper is leaking inside the tank and needs replacing,” said Sheck.

To detect a toilet leaks, remove the lid from the toilet tank and add a dye tablets left over from coloring Easter eggs or a few drops of food coloring to the water in the toilet tank. If the tank is leaking, color will appear in the bowl within 30 minutes. Flush as soon as the test is complete and then call Greg and Brandon.

#Savethefish